Utah Scenic Byway 24 RV Trip – Capitol Reef National Park

April 2018 – Utah Scenic Byway 24 between the towns of Loa and Hanksville goes through Capitol Reef National Park and is one of the most spectacular scenic drives in America. We have been fortunate to drive it several times in each direction, and every single time our jaws have hung open for the entire 64 miles as we’ve been utterly blown away by the dramatic scenery and wild rock formations passing by our windows.

Here’s a series of photos showing how it looked from the passenger seat of our truck as we towed our trailer across the magical wonderland of Capitol Reef Country from west to east.

It started with a lovely view of red rocks as we rounded a bend.

Utah Byway 24 Capitol Reef National Park Scenic Drive-min

Our first big red rocks view begins to take shape on Utah’s Scenic Byway 24

Then our eyes popped open as the contours and texture of the land grew bigger and more complex.

Utah Highway 24 Capitol Reef National Park Scenic Drive RV trip-min

Wow!

Suddenly, we started down a hill and the view exploded in front of us and became knock-your-socks-off stunning!

Utah 24 Capitol Reef National Park Scenic Drive-min

Wow, Wow, WOW!

A group of horses and cows live in this view all day every day, so they weren’t quite as impressed.

Horses on Utah Scenic Byway 24 Capitol Reef National Park RV trip-min

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But we were loving every minute as we drove head on into that view.

Utah Byway 24 Capitol Reef National Park Scenic Drive RV trip-min

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Views on Capitol Reef National Park Utah Highway 24 Scenic Drive-min

View out the side window.

Utah Byway 24 is easily driven in an RV, even though there are lots of twists and turns and climbs and descents, and we saw plenty of RVs on the road.

RV on Capitol Reef National Park Utah Scenic Byway 24 Scenic Drive-min

There are lots of RVs on this route.

Capitol Reef National Park Utah Byway 24 Scenic Drive RV trip-min

The road curves, climbs and descends, but it’s easy driving.
Just don’t get too distracted by the sensational views and drive off the road!

Capitol Reef National Park Utah Route 24 Scenic Drive RV trip-min

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RV on Utah Route 24 Capitol Reef National Park Scenic Drive-min

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The red rock views just kept coming and coming and coming.

Capitol Reef National Park Utah Route 24 Scenic Drive RV trip-min

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Red rocks Capitol Reef National Park Utah Route 24 Scenic Drive-min

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Capitol Reef National Park Utah Route 24 Scenic Drive Red rocks RV trip-min

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Exotic rock formations Capitol Reef National Park Utah Route 24 Scenic Drive-min

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The heart of Capitol Reef National Park is an old Mormon farming community called Fruita. As we drove past the village on Utah Highway 24, we noticed that the trees were still showing off their nakedness for winter. However, on other spring and summer visits, we’ve seen these trees lit up in brilliant shades of green that are the perfect visual contrast to the red rocks and blue sky.

Trees and red rocks Fruita Utah Route 24 Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park RV trip-min

These trees turn vivid green in spring!

Trees and red rocks Fruita Utah Route 24 Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park RV trip-min

Trees line the road near Fruita.

Fruita is a beautiful and tranquil little community, and there are camping options, a fantastic scenic drive into the depths of the red rocks, and some terrific hikes to historic Mormon sites. We have a detailed blog post about some of the highlights of Capitol Reef National Park and the town of Fruita from our visit a few years back (blog post here).

However, on this trip we were just driving through on Utah Highway 24. So, on we went, reminiscing when we passed some favorite spots and then quickly becoming immersed in the majestic scenery of Utah Scenic Byway 24 once again.

We had left red rock country behind and were now driving between rock walls that Mother Nature had painted in lighter shades.

Rock canyon Utah Byway 24 Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park RV trip_-min

We’d left the red rocks but were still surrounded by dramatic canyon walls.

Pinnacles Scenic

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Views Utah Route 24 Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park RV trip-min

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Sheer walls Capitol Reef National Park Utah Route Scenic Byway 24 RV truo

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There were still some hints of red rocks here and there, and we were mesmerized as we drove. A UPS truck went by in the opposite direction and we had to laugh. Surely, that driver has the best UPS route in the country!

Canyon walls Capitol Reef National Park RV trip Utah Highway 24 Scenic Drive-min

Not bad scenery for the few lucky folks who have to drive this route for work every day!

Canyon walls Capitol Reef National Park RV trip Utah Byway 24 Scenic Drive-min

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Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park RV trip Utah Scenic Byway 24

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Gradually, the soaring rock walls on either side of us receded, and the land opened up, punctuated by occasional towers of stone.

Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park RV trip Utah Route 24-min

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RV Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park Utah Route 24-min

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Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park RV trip Utah Route 24-min

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Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park RV trip Utah Route 24-min

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Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park RV trip Utah Route 24-min

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RV Scenic Drive Capitol Reef National Park Utah Byway 24-min

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Then the rock formations changed shape and the rock walls were filled with steep and angular channels that were carved with Nature’s sharpest chisels.

Exotic landscape Capitol Reef National Park Utah Scenic Highway 24 RV trip-min

Fine chisel work…

We were no longer in Capitol Reef National Park, but the landscapes in Utah pay no attention to such artificial boundaries. Utah Scenic Byway 24 was still giving us a magic carpet ride through some of the most exotic scenery America has to offer.

Desert landscape Capitol Reef National Park Utah Scenic Byway 24 RV trip-min

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Rock uplift Capitol Reef National Park Utah Route 24 Scenic Drive by RV-min

Massive rock uplifts make faces.

The chiseled walls returned, but the cows grazing underneath didn’t notice.

Spectacular landscape Capitol Reef National Park Utah Highway 24 Scenic Drive by RV

Dinner with a view!

Flowering tree Capitol Reef National Park Utah Highway 24 Scenic Drive by RV-min

A pink tree shows off its springtime finest.

Farm field Capitol Reef National Park Utah Scenic Byway 24 by RV-min

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As we neared the hamlet of Hanksville, the road took a few final sweeping turns past some walls of stone.

Stone canyon Capitol Reef National Park Utah Highway 24 Scenic Drive by RV-min

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Towering rock formation Capitol Reef National Park Utah Scenic Byway 24-min

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And then, in a final burst of glory, we passed a “mitten” rock formation that seemed to be advertising some of the other wonders of America’s southwest. “If you liked this road, you should check out Monument Valley!” it seemed to be saying.

Capitol Reef National Park Utah Route 24 Monument Valley lookalike-min

A mitten formation reminds us of Monument Valley.

What a glorious drive that was! I looked over at Mark to exchange happy glances and did a double take. Hey, who was doing the driving?

Puppy drives the truck and trailer

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We will never tire of driving the many wondrous scenic drives in Utah, and Utah Scenic Byway 24 is well worth experiencing many times in both directions. It attaches to Scenic Byway 12 and the fabulous Bicentennial Highway and is close to the little known Burr Trail too.

Even if your itinerary doesn’t include visiting Capitol Reef National Park for its hikes and camping, if you happen to be in southern Utah, treat yourself to an east-west detour and spend a few hours driving Utah Scenic Byway 24!

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The Burr Trail – A Fabulous Side Trip on Utah’s Scenic Byway 12

September 2016 – One of the most beautiful side trips along Utah’s Scenic Byway 12 is another scenic drive that branches off of Route 12 at the small hamlet of Boulder, Utah. Its called the Burr Trail.

Overlook Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

Looking out across the beginning of the Burr Trail

We first heard of this scenic back road from an old rancher who was a retired high school teacher and former football coach in Tropic, Utah, just outside of Bryce Canyon National Park.

As we leaned up against a fence with him, admiring his cows grazing in the distance, and listening to his tales of teaching and coaching back in the 70’s, he suddenly asked us if we’d ever driven the Burr Trail.

Boulder utah Post Office Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12

The post office in Boulder, Utah, where the Burr Trail begins.

We’d never even heard of it! But the more he talked about it, the more we knew we needed to check it out!

The little village of Boulder, Utah, has just a few buildings in it, so it is easy to drive right through it while barreling along on Scenic Byway 12.

But there’s a little store and an RV park, and there’s a post office that puts the town on the map. The turnoff to the Burr Trail is at the big 90 degree bend in Route 12 right by the Burr Trail Grill.

Boulder Utah RV Park  Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12

The Shopping District in Boulder, Utah

As soon as we drove onto the Burr Trail, the scenery went from ordinary to extraordinary in a matter of minutes.

Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

Heading down the Burr Trail

The road is narrow. It’s fine for passenger vehicles but is not recommended for RVs. We drove it with our truck on a weekday, and during the morning to midday hours we were on our own and didn’t see any other travelers.

Scenery Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

Views along the Burr Trail.

The rock formations became more and more dramatic with each mile that we drove.

Rock formations Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

Gorgeous views at every turn!

Dead tree Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

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And then the canyon walls began to get very steep on either side of us as we drove down the middle of Long Canyon.

Canyon Walls Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

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The entire Burr Trail is 69 miles from end to end, but only the first 30 miles are paved. So, we drove until the pavement ended and then turned around and came back.

Cliffs Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

Long Canyon has towering rock cliffs on both sides of the road.

On our way out on the Burr Trail, we had noticed a few cars parked on the side of the road at one spot. On our return trip, we stopped there to see what was going on.

It turned out to be a lovely but very short slot canyon!

Trees Long Canyon Slot Burr Trail Utah Scenicy Byway 12

Beautiful shade trees lead to a slot canyon

The first hundred feet or so of the slot canyon had a fantastic canopy of trees covering the trail, providing wonderfully cool shade at midday.

Slot Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

These trees are actually very tall!

Then, after another few paces and a slight turn in the trail, the slot canyon suddenly ended.

Long Canyon Slot Burr Trail Utah Scenicy Byway 12

End of the trail.

Sometimes this canyon is called the Singing Canyon, and we quickly found out why.

A group of hikers was just coming out of the slot canyon as we approached, and they passed by us on the way to their cars out on the road. When we got to the far back end of the slot, out of sight of the road, the hikers had made it to their cars and were standing around in the road talking with each other.

Starburst Long Canyon Slot Burr Trail Utah Scenic Byway 12

The sun shines through the slot.

Amazingly, we could hear everything they were saying, as if they were on the opposite side of us, beyond the impenetrable back end of the canyon!

I didn’t believe the sound could bounce around like that at first, but as soon as they drove off in their cars, the echoes of conversation at the back of the canyon fell silent.

Singing indeed. You’ve gotta be careful what you say out loud by the road when your friends head into this slot!

The Long Canyon Slot Burr Trail Utah Scenicy Byway 12

This canyon has incredible echoes!
Here a starburst from the sun dwarfs me… cool!

At the mouth of the sot canyon there are some beautiful red rock formations that beg to be climbed. We obliged, of course!

Red rock formations Long Canyon Slot Burr Trail Utah Scenicy Byway 12

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As we were leaving, we spotted the first signs of fall down on the ground. Yellow leaves were lying at the base of the tree trunks here and there.

Fall leaves and tree trunk

A golden harbinger of fall.

Back out on the Burr Trail, the rock formations were bright white and a rich burgundy red set off by dark green trees.

Red rocks and trees Burr Trail Utah Scenicy Byway 12

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We drove back through Long Canyon and watched in awe as the canyon walls rose up around us once again.

Red rocks Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

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Motorcycles Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

A pair of motorcycles takes in the view.

And then we were back in the open, sweeping vistas of the beginning of the Burr Trail.

What a drive!!

Wide vistas Burr Trail Scenic Byway 12 Utah

The Burr Trail is a wonderful excursion off of Scenic Byway 12 in Utah.

The Burr Trail is a really easy sidetrip for RVers traveling along Utah’s Scenic Byway 12, and is well worth taking a few hours to do.

Jewels like this are so easy to miss in this part of the world because the bigger, more famous stuff gets all the attention.

Thank goodness we met that old rancher in Bryce Canyon and hung out with him for a while by his fence, chatting about his cows, his former students and his football team, or we never would have learned about this beautiful place!

RV on Utah Scenic Byway 12

There are lots of gems for RVers on Utah’s Scenic Byway 12!

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More info about the Burr Trail :

Other posts from our RV trips on Utah’s Scenic Byway 12:

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Lower Calf Creek Falls Hike – Grand Staircase Escalante Nat’l Monument

September 2016 – Scenic Byway 12 in Utah is an All American Road that makes for a truly spectacular RV adventure. There are lots of sidetrips and things to do along the way, and one that we just loved was the hike to Lower Calf Creek Falls in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument.

Waterfall Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

The waterfall at Lower Calf Creek Falls

This is an easy 6 mile roundtrip hike that can be very hot at midday, so we started just as the trail was beginning to get light enough to see.

Trail to Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

We began our hike very early.

The Lower Calf Creek Falls Trail goes along Calf Creek. After passing through areas where very thick and tall underbrush not only surrounded us but rose above us on all sides, the trail emerged alongside a fabulous rock wall that was naturally striped with desert varnish.

Hiking to Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

Enormous cliffs covered with the vertical striping of “desert varnish”

Gradually, in places, the sun began to rise, and we found ourselves amid beautiful red rock formations.

Hike to Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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The trail cut across open grasslands.

Hiking trail to Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

Sun and shadow on Lower Calf Creek Falls.

And then it wandered across wide flat expanses of red rocks.

Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah Hike

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Birds were singing in the underbrush down by the creek, and at our feet we saw little lizards scurrying around.

Lizard Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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The canyon walls surrounding Calf Creek towered above us, and a lush valley of thick green vegetation grew along the banks of the creek.

Hike Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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Finally, after three miles of walking, we emerged at Lower Calf Creek Falls.

Waterfall Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

Lower Calf Creek Falls, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument.

This is a fabulous waterfall that plunges straight down from a notch in the cliffs above, forming a narrow vertical stream of water.

Hustling out on the trail before sunrise had ensured that when we got to Calf Creek Falls we were the only people there.

Waterfall of Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

The waterfall plunges into a pool at its base.

So we did the thing you just have to do in scenic places these days and we got a selfie!

Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

Towering canyon walls and their waterfall embrace us on the sandy beach.

How fabulous it was to have the entire place to ourselves and to be able to play with the waterfall’s reflections in pools and puddles along the sandy beach.

Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

Reflections…

Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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Gradually, the sun rose higher in the sky, lighting the upper parts of waterfall and the rocky walls.

Waterfall reflection Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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Sunrise on Waterfall Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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And then bright sunshine lit up the entire waterfall and we stepped back into the shadows of the natural arch formed by trees over the creek downstream.

Shadows Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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As the sun shone brighter and brighter, gradually illuminating the trees that seemed to be kneeling in reverence at the base of this magnificent waterfall, hikers began to trickle in from the trail. What an incredible view greeted them!

Sunshine waterfall Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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Eventually, we were ready to hike back out again, and we began to traverse the slabs of red rocks.

Hike to Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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The scenery was exotic…

Red rocks Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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And we were joined on the trail by lots of other hikers.

Hikers Lower Calf Creek Falls Trail Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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We noticed beautiful wildflowers growing here and there. Some were trailside down by our feet…

Wildflowers Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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And others looked out across the lush creek valley at the enormous cliffs on the other side.

Wildflowers hike Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

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For RVers that have an RV with a strong engine, an RV trip on Utah’s Scenic Byway 12 is an absolute must, along with a hike to Lower Calf Creek Falls.

RV campground Lower Calf Creek Falls Grand Staircase Escalante Utah

Calf Creek campground has some very cool campsites in the red rocks.

The BLM’s Calf Creek Campground is a fabulous place to camp for small and medium sized RVs. Bigger RVs can find a nice spot to stay in RV parks that are in the towns along the way. There are links below.

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More info about Lower Calf Creek Falls and Camping on Scenic Byway 12 in Utah:

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Utah Scenic Byway 12 RV Trip – Driving An All American Road!

September 2016 – One of America’s most dramatic and beautiful scenic drives goes between Bryce Canyon National Park and Capitol Reef National Park in Utah.

Scenic Byway 12 Utah RV trip

Utah’s Scenic Byway 12 is an All American Road

Classified as an All American Road by the (now defunct) National Scenic Byways Program, this drive is an awe-inspring drive through 123 miles of the most spectacular scenery anywhere.

RV trip Scenic Byway 12 Utah

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We began our drive just outside Bryce Canyon National Park and drove between towering sandstone walls that rippled in whites, greys, and pinks.

RV Utah Scenic Byway 12

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At the beginning of the drive we passed farmland and ranches that stretched across the vast landscape to cliffs in the distance.

Farmhouse on Scenic Byway 12 Utah

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Occasionally a cow standing by the side of the road watched us pass.

Cow on Scenic Byway 12 Utah

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Soon, the ranch land gave way to exotic red rock formations that rose up on either side of us.

Red rocks on Scenic Byway 12 Utah RV trip

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The road climbed and fell and swooped this way and that in big wide bends and tight hairpin turns.

Red rocks RV trip Scenic Byway 12 Utah

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There wasn’t a lot of traffic, as this road goes between tiny communities in a vast area. Many of the vehicles on the road were RVs.

RV motorhome on Utah Scenic Byway 12

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But this drive isn’t for the faint of heart or for RVs that are underpowered. One of the climbs we did was a 14% grade! We stopped at the top to get a photo of the sign for cars and trucks that were starting the descent.

14 percent grade Utah Scenic Byway 12

Utah Scenic Byway 12 is not for the faint of heart or for underpowered RVs.

Last year, we upgraded to a more powerful truck just so we could tow our 14,100 lb. trailer on roads like this and climb double digit grades without worrying about whether the truck could handle it.

RVing Utah Scenic Byway 12 in the red rocks

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As we had hoped, the truck didn’t even flinch even once on this stunning scenic drive. Lighter on their feet, lots of motorcycles were having a blast!

Motorcycle Utah Scenic Byway 12 RV trip

Scenic Byway 12 in Utah.

This would also be a stunning road for riding a bicycle, and we saw a van from Trek Tours providing sag support to their riders.

Trek Bike Tour Scenic Byway 12 Utah

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The patterns of colors on the red rocks were just gorgeous, and we stopped many times to look out across the incredible landscape and soak it all in.

RV motorhome Utah Scenic Byway 12 red rocks

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RVing Scenic Byway 12

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We had driven this route years ago with our popup tent trailer, but this is a road that is worth driving many times. Such views!!

RVing Utah Scenic Byway 12

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Red rocks Motorhome RV trip Utah Scenic Byway 12

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There are many things to see and do along the way on Utah’s Scenic Byway 12. Kodachrome Basin State Park, which was named for the film because the colors are so magnificent, is a true highlight.

RV motorhome Utah Scenic Byway 12

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We didn’t stop at Kodachrome Basin State Park this time, but we did the jaw-dropping Burr Trail drive, which we’ll share in an upcoming blog post.

Motorhome Scenic Byway 12 Utah RV trip

Don’t miss Utah’s Scenic Byway 12 in your RV travels!!

We also hiked to the majestic Lower Calf Creek Falls, which we’ll share soon too (smile).

RV motorhome Utah Scenic Byway 12 road trip

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But for RVers who don’t have the time to make any stops on Utah’s Scenic Byway 12, the road itself is so breathtaking that it is well worth a detour to experience.

To help you plan an RV trip on Scenic Byway 12 in Utah, there are some links below.

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More info about taking an RV trip on Scenic Byway 12 in Utah:

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Red Canyon Utah and the Bryce Canyon Bike Trail!

On the way in to Bryce Canyon National Park, visitors pass through stunning Red Canyon. The red rocks in this magical canyon are such a vivid color and such a huge surprise that visitors are instantly in a quandary — should they stick around and check out this gorgeous canyon they’ve never heard of before, or continue on the remaining 12 miles to Bryce Canyon, full speed ahead??

01 721 Hoodoos in Red Canyon Utah

For many visitors to Bryce Canyon, the warmup act at Red Canyon is a fantastic surprise.

Red Canyon is a beautiful area the has several wonderful hiking trails and lots of incredible scenery.

Hiking Pink Ledges Trail in Red Canyon Utah

Hoodoos at Red Canyon

We hiked the easy Pink Ledges trail that took us right into the heart of the red rock hoodoos in just a few uphill steps.

Hiking Pink Ledges Trail Red Canyon Utah

Views on the Pink Ledges Trail

We’ve hiked the beautiful trails in Red Canyon before, and it was wonderful to be immersed once again in this lovely red rock canyon that so many tourists blow right by.

Huge caves and holes in the rocks

Huge caves and holes in the rocks

The various hiking loops in Red Canyon can be mixed and matched to make a hike of any length, and the Pink Ledges Trail soon merged into the Bird’s Eye trail.

Heading out on the Bird's Eye Trail Red Canyon Utah

Views on the Bird’s Eye Trail

This took us out along the edges of the red rocks and rose higher and higher.

Hiking the Bird's Eye Trail Red Canyon Utah

Hiking the Bird’s Eye Trail.

Bird's Eye Trail hike in Red Canyon Utah

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We wandered back to the central part of the canyon and admired the twin hoodoos that stand like sentries high up on a ledge.

Closeup Hoodoos in Red Canyon Utah

Enormous stone sentries guard Red Canyon

Below them, we ran into a young couple sitting on a park bench enjoying the shade of a ponderosa pine and the views all around them. We found out they had just gotten engaged moments before, and they proudly showed us her beautiful brand new ring!

Couple on park bench in Red Canyon Utah

What a lovely spot to get engaged!

Red Canyon holds a special place in our hearts, because it was where we discovered the wonders of the RV lifestyle.

We were on a whiz-bang weeklong tour of Grand Canyon’s South and North Rim, Bryce Canyon and Zion National Park with our tent and bicycles, back in our workaday lives long ago, and we wound up camping at Red Canyon on the suggestion of a forest ranger we spoke with when we stopped in at the ranger’s office on the way to Bryce Canyon.

After a beautiful day at Bryce Canyon, we returned to the Red Canyon Campground to a massive deluge and thunderstorm that was followed by two days of rain.

Tent camping Red Canyon Campground Utah

Camping at Red Canyon Campground holds special memories for us

After scurrying from coffee shop to lunch bistro to dinner restaurant around Panguitch and Brian Head, desperately trying to stay warm and dry, we returned to the campground to find all the other campers happily kicking back in their RVs. They were reading books and playing board games with the lights on in their rigs, while we crawled back into our dark soggy tent.

RV Camping in Red Canyon Campground Utah

Life can be pretty sweet in an RV

Within a few days, we were the proud owners of a Toyota Tundra truck and a popup tent trailer!

RV Camping in Red Canyon Campground Utah

Camping at Red Canyon in a popup – Fun!!

Of course, tent camping is absolutely wonderful too, and we look back on our tenting days with fondness. But there’s nothing like being warm and dry and having a comfortable place to sit that is sheltered and high up off the ground when Mother Nature decides to let loose with a storm!

Tent camping under the stars

Camping under the stars

Red Canyon Campground is an absolute delight. You can camp within view of the red rock hoodoos, and there are a few campsites that are big enough for a big trailer like our fifth wheel.

Another treat at Red Canyon is the paved bike path. Being at 8,500′ elevation, we had to work a bit with each pedal stroke, but the scenery was second to none.

Red Canyon Bike Path in Utah

Riding in the Red Rocks at Red Canyon

The Red Canyon Bike Trail goes all the way from Red Canyon to Bryce Canyon City, the little hamlet that used to appear on maps as “Rubys Inn” because it is home to Ruby’s Inn, a family run operation that includes an inn, restaurant and an RV park.

Biking on the Red Canyon Bike Path Utah

We love this bike path

Every time we’ve been to this area in the past, we’ve wished that the bike trail went all the way into Bryce Canyon.

Bicycling the Red Canyon Bike Trail in Utah

There’s a little bridge on the east end of Red Canyon

Bicycling the Red Canyon and Bryce Canyon Bike Path

The bike path runs parallel to the highway for some of its route

Lo and behold, the National Park Service granted our wish this season and extended the paved bike trail all the way into Bryce Canyon as of a few weeks before our arrival!! It is now 17 miles long and you can ride from the west end of Red Canyon all the way to Inspiration Point in Bryce Canyon.

This project was undertaken and completed for the 100th anniversary of America’s National Parks this past August, and it takes a wonderfully winding route through the ponderosa pine forest right to the Bryce Canyon Visitors Center.

Bicycling on the Bryce Canyon Bike Trail Utah

The new paved bike path in Bryce Canyon passes through Ponderosa Pine forest

From the Visitors Center, the Bryce Canyon bike trail passes all the main overlooks and wanders away from the rim for a bit too as it swings by the Bryce Canyon Lodge.

Bryce Canyon Lodge Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

Bryce Canyon Lodge is on the route for the new Bryce Canyon bike trail

We had to get off our bikes and walk when we visited the overlooks in Bryce Canyon, but what a fabulous addition this bike trail is to one of the National Park Service’s premier parks. We were absolutely thrilled by the new bike path, and we rode it many times during our stay.

New Bryce Canyon Bike Trail to Inspiration Point

In Bryce Canyon we walked out to the overlooks

Hopefully the National Park Service will continue building bike paths at other National Parks. The bike trail at Grand Teton National Park is superb as well, and keeps getting longer each time we visit.

The best way to experience a National Park is to be outdoors in the thick of it, and how fantastic it is to be able to fly along and enjoy the views from the seat of a bike!

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More info about Red Canyon and the Bike Trail:

Our previous RV trip to Red Canyon:

Red Canyon Utah – An Overlooked Treasure09/15/11

More blog posts from our RV trips to Bryce Canyon

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Red Canyon Utah is an Overlooked Treasure

RV blog post - Red Canyon, Utah, is easy to miss, but  the hiking trails, bike path, hoodoos and spectacular views worthy of an extended stay.

Red Canyon Tunnel

Red Canyon, Utah, bike path.

Bike path through Red Canyon

Red Canyon, Utah, bike path.

The bike path is almost 9 miles long.

Red Canyon, Utah, bike path. Camped outside Red Canyon, Utah. Afternoon rainbow outside Bryce Canyon, Utah

Afternoon rainbow.

Morning visitors outside Bryce Canyon, Utah

Early morning visitor.

Red Canyon visitors center, Utah.

View from the Red Canyon visitors center.

Red Canyon hoodoos.

Hoodoos.

Red Canyon peekaboo arch.

A peephole on Pink Ledges Trail.

Views on Pink Ledges Trail, Red Canyon, Utah.

Burnt orange and forest green

backed by blue sky are the

colors of Red Canyon

Views on Pink Ledges Trail, Red Canyon, Utah.

Pink Ledges Trail.

Hoodoos on Pink Ledges Trail, Red Canyon, Utah. A storm approaches on Pink Ledges Trail, Red Canyon, Utah.

Storms roll in every afternoon.

Hoodoos on Pink Ledges Trail, Red Canyon, Utah remind us of Easter Island heads.

Utah's red rock answer to

Easter Island.

Bryce Canyon Rim Run - 5 miles of racing fun.

Bryce Canyon

Rim Run.

Wildflower at Red Canyon, Utah. Hikers headed to Bryce Canyon.

Ken and Marcia Powers,

exceptional long distance hikers.

The scenic road through Red Canyon, Utah.

The road through Red Canyon.

Bird's Eye View Trail in Red Canyon, Utah. Bird's Eye View Trail in Red Canyon, Utah.

Bird's Eye View Trail.

Hoodoos on Bird's Eye View Trail in Red Canyon, Utah. Tunnel Trail in Red Canyon, Utah.

Tunnel Trail.

Horses on the Red Canyon bike path, Utah. Mormon hand-cart in Panguitch, Utah.

Mormon hand-cart in Panguitch.

Quilt Walk Statue in Panguitch, Utah.

Mark helps commemorate the Quilt Walk.

Downtown Panguitch, Utah.

Downtown Panguitch.

Historic brick pioneer homestead, Panguitch, UT

Historic brick pioneer

homestead.

Cowboy Cafe Steakhouse -- a historic jail ? -- in Panguitch, UT

Perhaps the site of the

infamous jail.

Ebenezer Bryce's cabin in Tropic, Utah.

Home of Ebenezer Bryce, of "Bryce's Canyon."

Storms approach Arches Trail in Red Canyon, Utah.

Storms approach Arches Trail.

The first big arch along Arches Trail in Red Canyon, UT

Our one and only arch sighting.

Red Canyon, Utah

Late August, 2011 - We were on a roll uncovering the many gems that make up

America's finest crown jewels in Southern Utah.  Leaving Cedar Breaks, we pointed

the truck down the hill towards Red Canyon.  Most people on this road are headed to

the more famous Bryce Canyon National Park which lies just a little further on, and few

are aware that their path will cut right through the fabulous rock formations of Red

Canyon on their way there.  It's amusing to watch the steady stream of international

tourists flying through this five mile stretch of road, because as soon as they get into

Red Canyon the car windows fly open and heads pop out as the driver swerves into

the nearest pullout.  It is that beautiful.

We did that too, years ago.  And just like

everyone else, each time we have been back to

Bryce we've breezed through Red Canyon

without sticking around long enough to see it up

close.  All we had ever seen was the fantastic

paved bike path that weaves through the canyon

walls for almost 9 miles of spectacular riding.

Years ago we had ridden this

path when the bright blue

lupines were in bloom, but

this year we came later in the

season and the color

trimming the red rock views

was bright yellow.

There is a delightful little

campground in Red

Canyon where we had

camped in a tent long

ago.  It was there, in the

rain (which comes every

afternoon in July and

August), that we decided to get a trailer.  While we were shivering and running around

looking for indoor activities during the rain, we saw people kicking back in their RVs as

snug as little bugs in rugs.  Within two weeks of returning to Phoenix we had purchased

our first pop-up tent trailer and pickup truck.

This time we found a spot to

camp nearby and watched

the afternoon monsoon

clouds build and swirl  The

sky would go from bright blue

in the morning to almost

black in the afternoon, and then

huge raindrops would fall.

Sometimes we were blessed with

a rainbow.

One morning we woke to the

sound of cows mooing, and a small herd walked into a

corral nearby and hung out for a while, as if they were

waiting for the rancher and his truck to show up and take

them to market.

Red Canyon boasts many hiking trails, but some of

the best are short ones right outside the visitor

center.

Pink Ledges Trail took us on a winding, narrow path

partway up the canyon walls.  It led us back into a

vivid red backdrop of craggy rocks decorated with

rich green trees and then wound back out again

towards some hoodoos.

As usual, a storm was gathering in the

distance, and the sky got darker and

darker.  The hoodoos -- humanlike,

almost sculpted rock formations --

resembled the giant heads of Easter

Island.  But these were not crafted by

human hands and they glowed a rich

burnt orange.

We had found it extremely challenging to keep up any

kind of fitness regimen on the boat last winter, and as

soon as we got back to Phoenix, Mark had started

running everyday.  I was a little slower to get going,

but by the time we got to Red Canyon I had put my

running shoes on a few times.

Mark found out there was a 5 mile race at Bryce

Canyon, and before I had a chance to say, "How far?,"

there I was at the start line.  Luckily, the beginning of

the course wound along the edge of Bryce Canyon,

keeping my mind happily occupied with the views.  But when the route turned

away from the rim into the woods and continued uphill for over a mile all I could

think was, "Why did we start this exercise program at an altitude of 8,400 feet?"

Thrilled to have survived the race, we were

inspired to keep training.  One day I ran past

a couple walking down the road with walking

sticks and serious looking backpacks.  There

was nothing up the road for at least 30 miles,

so I had to stop running and find out where they had come from.  It

turns out they had walked 60 miles in the past three days to launch a

two month walking adventure.  They planned to hike through Bryce

Canyon into Utah's canyon country towards Page, Arizona where they

would arrive around Halloween.  Taking a breather at our trailer, they

told us their names were Ken and Marcia Powers and we discovered

they are celebrated hikers who have hiked not only the entire

Appalachian Trail and Pacific

Crest Trail but were the first

people to hike the entire cross-

country American Discovery Trail in one continuous hike

(it took 8 months).  They have done all this since they

retired 11 years ago.  "We didn't want to just sit at home,"

Marcia said.  They have logged thousands of miles of

other long distance hikes, and they chronicle their

adventures at http://www.GottaWalk.com.

We continued ticking off the short hikes around Red

Canyon, very self-conscious now that they were all just a

measly mile or so.  But they were spectacular.  The Bird's

Eye View hike goes up around the backside of the canyon

and the Tunnel Trail Hike follows a series of switchbacks

up a steep hill until it deposits you at a fantastic viewpoint

overlooking one of the tunnels spanning the main road.

Taking a break from the red rocks, we

ventured into the nearby town of

Panguitch.  A small city park

celebrates the town's mormon pioneer

history, and a hand-cart in the park

reminded us that whole groups of

people of all ages, some pulling hand-

carts, walked across this country

years ago to settle Utah.

Those pioneers were tough folk.  In 1864 the new mormon settlers in Panguitch

were starving, and seven men set out to cross the snow-covered mountains to

get supplies from Parowan some 40 miles away over a steep pass.  Unable to

make progress in the deep snow, they threw out a quilt and gathered on it to

pray.  Noticing the quilt supported their weight in the soft snow, they began

laying quilts out ahead and walking across them.  Amazingly, they walked all the

way to Parowan and back this way, lugging heavy loads of flour with them on

the return trip.  Mark decided to help out the commemorative Quit Walk statue

with his quilt.

The downtown

area of Panguitch

is listed on the National

Register of Historic Places, and

I had a walking tour map that

pointed out certain historic

homes and buildings.  The jail

intrigued me, but the location

on the map didn't correlate with

any buildings.

I began asking around, and

ended up on a wild goose chase as one shopkeeper sent me

to the next and I finally ended up with a group of little old white

haired ladies "who know all the history of this town."  My jail

query started quite a discussion among them, but not one was

sure where this jail was or might have been.  "It's down by your

house," one woman said.  "A jail by my house?  No, it was at

the other end of town…"  We were all laughing by the time I

left, but apparently this historic jail in this historic town had

slipped from historic memory.  Making one last stop at

Cowboy's Steakhouse Cafe on my way

out of town, the bartender said

thoughtfully, "Well, this building used to

be a jail.  I think what you're looking for

is right here."

An easier landmark to find was in the

town of Tropic in the opposite direction

past Bryce Canyon.  Back in the

mid-1870's, Ebenezer Bryce built a road through the woods leading to

a pink cliff canyon to make timber more accessible for the settlers of

the area.  The amphitheater of red rock at the end of his road became

known as "Bryce's Canyon," even though he moved to Arizona just a

few years later.  His wee home is on display in Tropic.  Poking our

heads inside the tiny door, I couldn't imagine what winters were like for

a real family of full-sized people living in such a dollhouse.

Ready for one last blast of red rocks, we checked out Arches Trail at

the edge of Red Canyon.  This trail boasts 15 arches, although a

couple completing the hike as we arrived said they had found only

five.  We charged up the path, quickly deciding that this was by far the

best hike of them all.  The path twists and turns as it climbs, and each

view is more enchanting than the last.  We spotted an arch and

rushed up to it just as a huge thunder-boomer rumbled and lightning

flashed in the distance.

In no time at all the sky went black.  We saw a cave in the distance

and hatched a plan to go hide in the cave until the rain ended.

What a terrific adventure that would be!  But we couldn't find a

path to the cave, so we ran back to the truck instead.

Unfortunately, the rain wasn't the kind that would blow over any

time soon, and we were leaving Red Canyon next day, so when

we drove away from Arches Trail we realized we were leaving

most of it for a future visit to Red Canyon.  But at least we now

know it is a hike that is well worth doing!

We hustled south along I-15 making stops for the Iron County Fair in Parowan, Utah and the Interbike bicycle trade show in Las

Vegas, Nevada, and we finally landed in Williams, Arizona on famous Route 66.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zion NP, Kodachrome Basin & Snow Canyon, UT – Great Red Rocks!

Chukar at Kodachrome State Park, Utah Kodachrome State Park, Utah Ballerina Leg at Kodachrome State Park, Utah

Ballerina Leg

Chukar at Kodachrome State Park, Utah Soft sandstone at Kodachrome State Park, Utah Zion National Park, Utah Zion National Park, Utah Zion National Park, Utah Zion National Park, Utah Zion National Park, Utah Zion National Park, Utah Zion National Park, Utah Zion National Park, Utah Zion National Park, Utah Snow Canyon State Park, St. George Utah

Snow Canyon

Snow Canyon State Park, St. George Utah

Snow Canyon

Zion NP, Kodachrome, & Snow Canyon, UT

October 7-19, 2007 - From Goblin Valley we took the gorgeous scenic

byway along Route 12 through Torrey, Capitol Reef National Park, and

Escalante to Kodachrome Basin State Park.  Like all the Utah state park

campgrounds, this one was lovely.  There was a flock of chukars (birds

closely related to the quail) that

wandered about the grounds happily

taking food from my hand.

We hiked the Panorama Point View trail,

soaking in the immense redrock

formations.  Several had cute names,

including Ballerina Leg, which truly

looked like a ballerina's leg.

Sandstone is very soft, and we found

a huge sandstone rock that other visitors had

rubbed.  It was fun to put your hand in the handprint

in the rock and rub.  The rock would granulate into

sand beneath your fingertips.

From Kodachrome Basin we headed over

to Zion National Park.  Because we were

towing the trailer and we were 52 feet from

end to end, we opted to approach the park

from the west side rather than taking the

really cool twisting road in from the east.  So we didn't see the

amazing rock formations that flank the roads on the eastern side.

However, once we arrived at Zion we took an exquisite bike ride along

the bike path that leads into the park.  The road into the main canyon

is closed to motorized vehicles, and we thrilled to the mammoth cliffs

on either side of us as we rode deep into the canyon.

There was an organized bike

ride going through Zion a few

days after we did our bike

ride.  It would be fun to be

part of a large crowd of

cyclists taking over this pretty

road through the park, but we

enjoyed the solitude of riding

by ourselves beneath the

towering spires.  We had a

perfect day with warm

temperatures, clear blue

skies and lots of flowers in

bloom.

We were continuing to press on

southwards, barely staying ahead

of the winter weather behind us.  At

Snow Canyon State Park we found

another delightful campground

where we tucked ourselves right up

against the redrocks.  We rode our

bikes on the beautiful park road

and looped through some pretty

new masterplanned neighborhoods

on the outskirts of St. George.

At last it was time to leave

Utah.  We decided we would

return in the Spring of 2008,

as we had barely touched

upon the areas we wanted to

see.  In the meantime,

however, the cold was

forcing us out, and we drove

south to the outskirts of Las

Vegas, Nevada, where we

found the spectacular Valley

of Fire State Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blog posts from our RV trips to Zion National Park:

Blog posts from the area near Zion National Park:

Blog posts from all our travels to National Parks and UNESCO World Heritage Sites in North America

More great RV dry camping destinations:

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