Bryce Canyon’s Rainbow Point – Bristlecone Pines and Sweeping Vistas

September 2016 – Our stay in Bryce Canyon National Park had been a wonderful immersion in orange and pink spires along the Rim Trail and on the new bike path that runs between Red Canyon and Inspiration Point. We’d even found a waterfall at Mossy Cave.

Shelter at Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

Visitors’ shelter at Rainbow Point in Bryce Canyon National Park

At the far south end of the Bryce Canyon National Park, we hiked the Bristlecone Loop around Rainbow Point. We didn’t see a rainbow over the canyon, as we had at Fairyland Point, but the views were sensational.

Hiking Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

What a view! Rainbow Point at Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah

Rainbow Point View Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

Rainbow Point, Bryce Canyon National Park.

The orange and red rock cliffs had interesting windows and holes carved in their sides. Mark nudged me as we stared across the canyon and said, “See the Alice Cooper eyes over there?” Sure enough!

Alice Cooper eyes at Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

Alice Cooper eyes…

This end of Bryce Canyon is the highest point in the whole National Park, about 9,100 feet in elevation, and it is just the kind of wind blown, rocky place that ancient bristlecone pines love to make home.

Brislecone Pine Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

A bristlecone pine at Rainbow Point in Bryce Canyon

As we walked out on a bluff, we came across a large stand of bristlecone pine trees that had finally given up the ghost. Unlike the living 1,600 year old bristlecone pine we’d seen a month earlier at Cedar Breaks National Monument whose gnarled branches were vibrantly alive and covered with soft pine needles and pine cones tucked into its craggy skeleton, these trees were totally bare.

Three bristlecone pine trees Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

Ghosts of bristlecone pine trees

They stood together, as if continuing an ageless conversation that had begun long ago, and their wood was bleached by the sun.

Bristlecone Pine Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

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When I touched their branches and knocked on the trunks with my knuckles, their wood was as hard as rock and felt very dense.’

Bristlecone Pines Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

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The stand of bristlecone pines numbers just a few dozen trees, but each raised its branches to the heavens in its own graceful way.

Bristlecone Pine Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

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At our feet, the trees cast beautiful shadows across the ground.

Bristlecone Pine Shadow Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

A bristlecone plays with its shadow

The trees stand near the edge of a sheer cliff, and as we walked along the rim and looked back, we got an eye-popping view of the scale of people standing on the cliff, the tree skeletons, and the huge drop down.

Cliffs Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

People get a selfie by the bristlecone pines and cliffs at Rainbow Point

The National Park Service wisely warns people not to go too close to the edge, but it’s hard to resist…

Overlook Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

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Back near the start of the trail we came across a group of people staring intently into the woods, their cameras and cell phones held high.

People photography a buck deer at Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

Nature’s paparazzi

Tip-toeing over to join them and see what they were looking at, we saw a beautiful buck nibbling on leaves in the bushes. He paused to stare at us all and then went back to munching the tender leaves.

Buck deer at Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

A buck becomes the star of the show at Rainbow Point

We wrapped up our hike around the Bristlecone Loop and began to say our sad goodbyes to Bryce Canyon National Park.

We’d had an extraordinary visit this year, and we’d had a chance to take in some of the most beautiful spots in the Park. But we still haven’t seen it all, and we’ve made notes of the places we want to visit next time…

Posing Rainbow Point Bryce Canyon National Park Utah

Bryce Canyon’s siren song will lure us back again and again.

If you are planning an RV trip to Bryce Canyon National Park, there is an awful lot to see and experience. Below are some links to help you plan your adventure:

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4 thoughts on “Bryce Canyon’s Rainbow Point – Bristlecone Pines and Sweeping Vistas

  1. Seems you guys are never going to get out of Bryce. Can never get enough photos and memories there. Of course, I’m sure you are already on to other great places by now. Think I have already mentioned…..Bryce is my favorite National Park. Thanks for sharing. So beautiful all the time!

    • Oh gosh, Rose, I am always behind on our blog because it takes time to sort through our photos, choose the best ones, and tell the tales. So at this point I am 7 weeks behind and we have done many wonderful and exciting things since we left. In the past I would skip over places to try to catch up, but I think the photos and stories are timeless, and who cares if they are little late in arriving on this blog. They will be enjoyed by readers for years to come!

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